Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
May 21, 2019, 09:19:06 am

Login with username, password and session length


Members
Stats
  • Total Posts: 693
  • Total Topics: 250
  • Online Today: 15
  • Online Ever: 334
  • (July 01, 2012, 10:57:46 pm)
Users Online
Users: 0
Guests: 6
Total: 6

Welcome

Welcome to the Real Health Forums. Share your stories and thoughts on the many health challenges facing us today. Check in frequently to read what others have to say, post your comments, and hopefully learn more about how you can reach your own health goals.

Privacy Warning: Please realize that these forums are open to all, and are fully searchable via Google and other search engines. If this concerns you, then do not use a username or avatar that are self-identifying in any way. We do not allow the deletion of anything you post in these forums, so think before you post.
  • The information shared in these forums, by moderators and members, is designed to complement, not replace, the relationship between an individual and his/her own physician.
  • All members of these forums are, by default, not considered to be licensed medical providers. If otherwise, users must clearly define themselves as such.
  • Product advertisement (including links); banners; and clinical trial, study or survey participation—is strictly prohibited by forums members unless permission has been secured from the Real Health Forum Moderators.
Finished Reading This? You can collapse this or any other box on this page by clicking the symbol in each box.

Author Topic: What is high blood pressure?  (Read 9034 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline lillywilliam

  • Member
  • Posts: 14
What is high blood pressure?
« on: February 20, 2009, 05:14:27 am »
High blood pressure (HBP) or hypertension means high pressure (tension) in the arteries. Arteries are vessels that carry blood from the pumping heart to all the tissues and organs of the body.

High blood pressure does not mean excessive emotional tension, although emotional tension and stress can temporarily increase blood pressure. Normal blood pressure is below 120/80; blood pressure between 120/80 and 139/89 is called "pre-hypertension", and a blood pressure of 140/90 or above is considered high.

It was previously thought that rises in diastolic blood pressure were a more important risk factor than systolic elevations, but it is now known that in people 50 years or older systolic hypertension represents a greater risk.

Offline chanchalseo

  • Newbie
  • Posts: 2
Re: What is high blood pressure?
« Reply #1 on: January 07, 2010, 06:37:00 am »
Thanks for this information, Nervous tension is a major reason for high blood pressure. There are so many reasons for high blood pressure, it could be your diet, weight, and do you smoke. Try losing a little weight and see if it helps you at all.

Good bye.

-------------------------------
Health Insurance

Offline KristenSwan

  • Member
  • Posts: 24
Re: What is high blood pressure?
« Reply #2 on: February 23, 2019, 05:03:44 am »
Hypertension is another name for high blood pressure. It can lead to severe complications and increases the risk of heart disease, stroke, and death.
Blood pressure is the force exerted by the blood against the walls of the blood vessels. The pressure depends on the work being done by the heart and the resistance of the blood vessels.

Hypertension and heart disease are global health concerns. The World Health Organization (WHO) suggests that the growth of the processed food industry has impacted the amount of salt in diets worldwide, and that this plays a role in hypertension.

While blood pressure is best regulated through the diet before it reaches the stage of hypertension, there is a range of treatment options.

Lifestyle adjustments are the standard first-line treatment for hypertension.

Regular physical exercise
Doctors recommend that patients with hypertension engage in 30 minutes of moderate-intensity, dynamic, aerobic exercise. This can include walking, jogging, cycling, or swimming on 5 to 7 days of the week.

Stress reduction
Avoiding stress, or developing strategies for managing unavoidable stress, can help with blood pressure control.
Using alcohol, drugs, smoking, and unhealthy eating to cope with stress will add to hypertensive problems. These should be avoided.
Smoking can raise blood pressure. Giving up smoking reduces the risk of hypertension, heart conditions, and other health issues.

 


© 2019 Smart + Strong. All Rights Reserved.   terms of use and your privacy
Smart + Strong® is a registered trademark of CDM Publishing, LLC.